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Certified Cabinet KCMA

What does it mean to be KCMA Certified?

In Stock Kitchens – KCMA ApprovedThe Kitchen Cabinet Manufacturers Association Certification Program assures the specifier or user of kitchen cabinets and bath vanities that the cabinet bearing the blue and white seal complies with the rigorous standards set by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and sponsored by the Kitchen Cabinet Manufacturers Association (KCMA).

The Kitchen Cabinet Manufacturers Association (KCMA) is a voluntary, non-profit trade association representing North American cabinet manufacturers and suppliers to the industry. KCMA is an influential advocate for the industry and since 1955 has administered the nationally recognized performance standard for cabinets (ANSI/KCMA A161.1). Today, KCMA also is leading the way in promoting responsible environment practices in the industry. All shelves and bottoms are loaded at 15 pounds per square foot, and loading is maintained for seven days to ensure that there is no excessive deflection and no visible sign of joint separation or failure of any part of the cabinets or the mounting system. Mounted wall cabinets are gradually loaded to 600 pounds without any visible sign of failure in the cabinet or the mounting system. To test the strength of base-front joints, a load of 250 pounds is applied against the inside of cabinet-front stiles for cabinets with drawer rail, or 200 pounds is applied for cabinets without drawer rail, to ensure reliable front joints that will not open during stress in service or during installation.
To test the ability of shelves, bottoms, and drawer bottoms to withstand the dropping of cans and other items, a three-pound steel ball is dropped from six inches above the surface. After the test the drawer must not be damaged and must operate as before the test with no visible sign of joint separation or failure of any part of the cabinet or mounting system.
To test the ability of cabinet doors and connections to withstand impacts such as children may cause in falling against a cabinet, a 10-pound sandbag is used to strike the center of a closed cabinet door and repeated with the door opened to a 45-degree angle. The door must operate as before the test and show no damage or sign of separation or failure in the system.

Further, the cabinet is an exact duplicate of samples that have been independently tested for conformance to ANSI/KCMA A161.1-2000. To find out more about KCMA Certification, visit their website at www.kcma.org. To print our pamphlet about KCMA Certification, please click here. To further ensure or cabinets will stand the test of time we have put our cabinets through 13 rigorous KCMA tests and passed them all.

1. Shelves and bottoms are loaded at 15 pounds per square foot to ensure no excessive deflection or joint failure on the cabinet or mounting system.

2. Installed wall cabinets are loaded with 500 pounds to ensure that the cabinet will accept net loading in compliance with ANSI A161.1-1995 requirements.

3. A load of up to 250 pounds is applied against the inside of cabinet fronts to ensure reliable front joints.

4. A 3 pound steel ball is “drop tested” against shelves, cabinet bottoms and drawer bodies to ensure cabinets will withstand dropping of cans and other items.

5. Cabinets are impact tested by striking the center of a closed and open door with a 10 pound sand bag.

6. Cabinet doors are weighted with 65 pounds and operated 10 times to test the ability of door and hinges to withstand loading.

7. Doors are opened and closed for 25,000 cycles to ensure durabiltiy under the stress of normal usage.

8. Drawers and drawer mechanisms are tested at 15 pounds per square foot and operated through 25,000 opening and closing cycles to assure durabilty.

9. A 3 pound weight is dropped 10 times against the drawer assembly to ensure that the drawer front assembly will withstand the impact of closing.

10. Cabinets are cycle tested at temperatures ranging from -5° F to +120° F to ensure finish will withstand temperature changes.

11. Cabinets are hot box tested at temperatures up 120° F to ensure finish will withstand high heat.

12. Finish is exposed to vinegar, grape juice, olive oil, lemon juice, 100 proof alcohol and more to ensure no appreciable discoloration, stain or whitening of the finish occurs.

13. A 24-hour soap and water solution test checks the finish’s ability to withstand exposure to detergents and moisture.

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